Mensa dating service

According to Match's data, 80 per cent of singles say they "must have" or find it "very important" to be with someone of the same intelligence level."80 per cent of singles rate intelligence as one of the most important factors when looking for a partner, finally proving that brainpower is the ultimate aphrodisiac," said Amarnath Thombre, President of Match.Passionate about music, journalism and Newcastle United.Mensa, the 67-year-old circle jerk for self-proclaimed geniuses, and Match.com, the guys who brought you creepy callbacks to long-lost loves, have teamed up to reveal a new dating service.Small Talk Lizzie O'Leary, host of the new show Marketplace Weekend, tells us about a new collaboration between "genius society" Mensa and dating site Match.com, Mensa Match, intends to help the super-smart meet each other, super-high-standards and all.In what may be considered a very smart pairing, American Mensa and Match have teamed up to provide a dating experience exclusively for Mensa members, as well as provide all Match members access to some of the most intelligent people in the nation.“80% of singles rate intelligence as one of the most important factors when looking for a partner, finally proving that brainpower is the ultimate aphrodisiac,” said Amarnath Thombre, President of Match.“Partnering with Mensa now gives Match members another smart way to easily search for and connect with likeminded singles.” In addition to the presence of the Mensa brand on Match.com, the world’s largest dating service is launching Mensa Match.com, a dating portal for the exclusive use of Mensa members.

According to the site, those most likely to use the service, based on their percentage of Ivy League graduates, will come from Durham, North Carolina, Los Alamos, New Mexico, Ithaca, New York, Washington, D. Helen Fisher, a professor at the University of Indiana and Match.com's chief scientific adviser, cites studies that suggest relationships with a brainy mate could come with perks.We are excited about it.” Simon is the editor of Global Dating Insights.Born in Newcastle, he has an English degree from Queen Mary, London and after working for the NHS, trained as a journalist with the Press Association.This exclusivity — some might say snobbery — is part of Mensa's lore.Early Mensans in Britain walked around with yellow buttons, organizational publications once referred to non-Mensa members as "Densans," and last year, a top Mensa member and tester called anyone with an IQ of 60 a "carrot." In short, you don't always join Mensa because you think you're smart.

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